Method of producing riboflavin

A method of producing riboflavin by culturing riboflavin-producing microbes at a culture medium using a plant oil or a creature oil as a carbon source, forming and collecting riboflavin therein and collecting riboflavin therefrom, wherein a carrier of a clay mineral with oil-adsorbing land, a chemically treated product or a calcium compound is made within the culture medium. The riboflavin is produced maintaining a high yield and in an elevated production rate at a minimal cost without requiring cumbersome operations for concentrating and regaining the riboflavin. It’s further permitted to recover the riboflavin by efficiently utilizing the waste plant oil or the waste animal oil which is to be disposed of.

 

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BACKGROUND

 

 
There’s long been known a way of generating riboflavin by culturing riboflavin-producing microbes in a culture medium, forming and collecting riboflavin therein and collecting riboflavin therefrom. As the riboflavin-producing microbes,there have also been known to utilize Eremothecium ashbyii, Ashbya gossypii, Candida flareri, Mycocandida riboflavina, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and to utilize Bacillus riboflavin-producing microbes (Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication (Kokai) No.66894/1974), variable strains of Streptomyces testaceus (Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 116690/1975), Achromobactor riboflavin-producing microbes (Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 54094/1977), Previbacteriumriboflavin-producing microbes (Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 110897/1977), Saccharomyces riboflavin-producing microbes (Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 241895/1985), Candida phamata (ATCC 20849) (InternationalPatent Publication No. 509221/1993).
 

 
Since the carbon sources from the culture medium, there have been known to use saccharides such as glucose and sucrose, starches or hydrolyzed products , acetic acid, citric acid, ethanol, or hydrocarbons and benzoic acid for certainkinds of germs.
 

 
However, when oils and fats are used as carbon sources, oils and fats must be dispersed in an aqueous culture medium. For this use, the culture medium has to be awakened, or even a dispersant or a emulsifier has to be added into the system.
 

 
Under the stirring conditions where the oils are suspended or discharged in water, however, it’s confirmed that the microbes are murdered and destroyed leading to a drop in the yield of riboflavin.
 

 
According to the way of incorporating the dispersant or the emulsifier into the machine, farther, the microbes are necessarily and negatively influenced by these drugs and, besides, the additional drugs blends into the riboflavin that’s formed.
 

IP reviewed by Plant-Grow agriculture technology news